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SWAP

Giving SWAP images a make over - novel image processing techniques

In 2014 Morgan and Druckmuller introduced a new image processing technique to reveal information at the finest scales of solar images, whilst maintaining enough of the larger-scale information to provide context.
 
Processed SWAP image

A Monster Active Region

Active Region 12209, the same region that gave us a half-dozen X-class solar flares during its last rotation across the Sun, is returning. Currently on the east limb, it is a spectacular sight for SWAP, the EUV imager on-board PROBA2.

SWAP's view of AR 12209 on the east limb of the Sun.

 

SWAP/PROBA2 Observes Partial Solar Eclipse

On Thursday, October 23, 2014, SWAP, an ultraviolet telescope onboard PROBA2, observed three separate passages through the Moon's shadow, meaning it witnessed three partial solar eclipses in a single day!

SWAP Observations of the 2014 October 23 Solar Eclipse

Recent Improvements to SWAP Image Calibration

Frequent users of SWAP data or watchers of SWAP movies may have noticed some unusual behavior in these images and movies in the last few days. We've been improving the spatial calibration of the data and our tests resulted in a few unusual images, but now that everything is finished you'll notice SWAP images look better and are easier to use than ever before.

Using the SpoCA segmentation suite to track long term variations in EUV observations

A recent paper by Verbeeck, C. et al.

MYSTERIES DEEPEN AS COMET ISON FAILS TO MAKE LONG ANTICIPATED APPEARANCE

MYSTERIES DEEPEN AS COMET ISON FAILS TO MAKE LONG ANTICIPATED APPEARANCE

The long-awaited and much-hyped comet ISON surprised astronomers and solar physicists when it mysteriously failed to appear in images from extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) solar telescopes on Thursday. The SWAP solar telescope, on board the Belgium-based ESA mission PROBA2, conducted an extraordinary campaign to image ISON, but failed to detect any sign of the unusual comet.

No Clues from Comet ISON

Comet ISON raced past the Sun on November 28, but left no clues about its structure — or the structure of the solar corona — for extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) telescopes like SWAP that had been turned towards the unique comet in the hope of capturing images of its passage through perihelion.

PROBA2 waits for Comet ISON

In just a few hours, Comet ISON will whip past the surface of the sun at hundreds of kilometers per second, and PROBA2 is waiting to capture its passage through perihelion.

Comet ISON Approachs

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