About the PROBA2 Science Center

PROBA2

The PROBA2 Science Center, located at the Royal Observatory of Belgium in Brussels, oversees scientific operations and data processing for ESA's PROBA2 spacecraft. The P2SC is the primary archive and distribution center for data from SWAP and LYRA, as well as the primary maintainer of calibration tools, data analysis software, and additional instrument data. The P2SC is also home to the science operations center, where instrument observing plans are devised and, with the help of ESA's Spacecraft Operations Center in Redu, Belgium, loaded onto the spacecraft. Finally, the P2SC serves as the main site for coordination of the PROBA2 Science Working Team, coordinating special scientific campaigns, supporting science data users and guest investigators, and organizing PROBA2 outreach efforts.

PROBA2 is a small ESA satellite with a scientific mission to explore the active Sun and its effect on the near-earth environment and a broader mission to provide a test platform for new instrument and platform technology. The mission overview page provides additional information about PROBA2 and its on board instrumentation and advanced platform technology.

If you require special assistance, you can contact the instrument teams directly using the contact page on this site.

News

PROBA2 waits for Comet ISON

In just a few hours, Comet ISON will whip past the surface of the sun at hundreds of kilometers per second, and PROBA2 is waiting to capture its passage through perihelion.

Comet ISON Approachs

SWAP observes three partial solar eclipses

Three partial solar eclipses were observed  by PROBA-2 as it moved in and out of the Moon’s shadow during the 03-Nov-2013 ‘hybrid’ solar eclipse.

A hybrid eclipse is comprised of a total solar eclipse and an ‘annular eclipse’, depending on an observer’s viewing location on Earth.

During a total solar eclipse, the Moon moves between the Sun and the Earth, their alignment and separation are such that the much closer Moon appears large enough to block out the light from the much more distant Sun.

Pages